Eco-Cha Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong

Country of Origin: Taiwan
Leaf Appearance: dark green, tightly rolled
Ingredients: oolong tea
Steep time: 30 seconds
Water Temperature: 212 degrees
Preparation Method: porcelain gaiwan
Liquor: gold

The aromatics of Taiwanese high mountain oolong is one of my absolute favorite smells. This one is unroasted and according to +Eco-Cha Artisan Teas was oxidized a bit more than the standard. It’s definitely a tea that you need to sit down and take your time with. The taste was complex without being overly heavy or green. Floral notes were expected but I was surprised to find that it was also quite fruity. The mouthfeel was smooth and later infusions had a subtle creaminess. A slight sourness also developed after a few rounds. That probably sounds like a bad thing but it’s really not. I’ve noticed a similar taste in good quality Tie Guan Yin. Eco-Cha sources their teas directly from farmers and I love the stories that they tell. Here’s what they had to say about this tea:

This farm is managed by a husband and wife team who transformed their plot of virgin high mountain bamboo forest into a tea garden just ten years ago. They produce approximately 300 pounds of tea from a typical day’s spring harvest, compared to 1000 pounds a day from larger productions in the area. 

This is the second tea that I have tried from this company and so far I am very impressed. In case you missed it, Andy from Eco-Cha contributed a guest post about Taiwanese tea plants.

Shan Lin Xi High Mountain Oolong sample provided by Eco-Cha.

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This farm is managed by a husband and wife team who transformed their plot of virgin high mountain bamboo forest into a tea garden just ten years ago. They produce approximately 300 pounds of tea from a typical day’s spring harvest, compared to 1000 pounds a day from larger productions in the area.

This is the second tea that I have tried from this company and so far I am very impressed. In case you missed it, Andy from Eco-Cha contributed a guest post about Taiwanese tea plants.”,
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