Teavivre Taiwan High Mountain Oolong

Teavivre Taiwan High Mountain Oolong

Country of Origin: Taiwan
Leaf Appearance: deep green, tightly rolled
Ingredients: oolong tea
Steep time: 30 seconds
Water Temperature: 200 degrees
Preparation Method: porcelain gaiwan
Liquor: pale gold

I love all teas, especially oolongs, but sometimes there is nothing that hits the spot quite like a Taiwanese high mountain oolong. This offering from +TeaVivre was produced using Si Ji Chun, otherwise known as Four Season Oolong. The taste was wonderfully clean, sweet and subtle. Its aroma had a light floral quality without being too heady or perfumy. The finish was surprisingly brisk with a lingering sweetness. Although the flavor profile was fairly simple it was by no means boring. I just may be picking some of this up in bulk for summertime cold brewing. It’s a matter of personal taste but I really prefer Taiwanese teas like this one when it comes to greener oolongs. Similarly styled oolongs from China tend to be a bit too cloying and one note for me. So what makes a high mountain oolong a high mountain oolong? They have to be grown at an elevation of 800m or higher. The cooler weather and reduced sunlight make the leaves work harder, producing a better tasting end result.

Taiwan High Mountain Oolong sample provided by Teavivre.

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