• Books and Magazines

    The Art and Craft of Tea by Joseph Wesley Uhl

    One of the best things about being part of the tea world is seeing my favorite people do awesome things. When the man behind +Joseph Wesley Black Tea announced that he had written a book on tea I may have done a happy dance. Not only did I know that he really knows his stuff but he has an incredible sense of aesthetic (but I’m sure you already knew that). For starters, the book is beautifully designed both inside and out. It’s obvious that a lot of thought went into every last detail. Most books on the subject of tea are rather stuffy affairs, full of pomp and circumstance. The Art and Craft of Tea…


  • Books and Magazines

    How to Eat by Thich Nhat Hanh

    I’ve seen quotes from Thick Nhat Hanh from time to time but never really took the time to read his writings until recently. No Mud, No Lotus was added to my Kindle after seeing it mentioned in a blog post from +Bonnie Eng. I was delighted to find several references to tea in my latest read. The basics of this book are about slowing down and taking the time to savor everything we eat or drink. When we take a bite of bread, do we stop to think about everything that went into making that loaf? Without being preachy, there are many important points made about gratitude and only taking as much as we…

  • Books and Magazines

    Making Tea, Making Japan: Cultural Nationalism in Practice by Kristin Surak

    I have an extremely long reading to-do list. The books are mostly tea related though not always. This particular book has been on my Amazon wishlist for some time. It had come up in my recommendations but I thought it was a bit odd that I had never seen it mentioned on blogs or in my other tea circles. How could that be? Although it is a sociological study, I have to say that this is one of the most fascinating books on Japanese tea culture that I have had the pleasure to read. There were some parts that got a bit dry but otherwise I thought it was a very engaging read.…

  • Tea Journey Magazine
    Books and Magazines

    Tea Journey: Exactly What the Tea World Has Been Waiting For

    I’ve been seriously studying tea for many years now and one of my biggest frustrations has been the lack of quality information in the west. While there have been some excellent books published recently I still find myself thirsting for more. Over the years I’ve poured through back issues of Art of Tea or struggled with Google translate more times than I can count. When I first heard rumors of a new magazine for serious tea drinkers I might have done a back flip or two. All I could think was, it’s about time! Needless to say, I’ve already subscribed to Tea Journey Magazine and taken a thorough look at the inaugural issue. The…

  • Books and Magazines

    Myths & Legends of Tea, Volume 1 by Gary D. Robson

    I love learning about the different legends, myths and folklore that surrounds Camellia Sinensis. Chinese culture is particularly full of these embellishments but tea stories can be found all over the world. I’ve had the pleasure of sitting on several Tea Bloggers Round Tables with Gary D. Robson, owner and proprietor of Red Lodge Books & Tea. He is easily spotted at events because he is usually the only very tall man wearing a kilt and a cowboy hat. When I heard that he was putting together a collection of tea legends my interest was definitely piqued. Some of the stories are ones that I’ve heard before, like Tie Guan Yin, but others…

  • Books and Magazines

    How to Make Tea by Brian Keating and Kim Long

    I’m always excited when I hear about new tea books so I couldn’t resist snapping this one up when I had an Amazon credit to use up. These days I mostly read on my Kindle but I sprung for the hardcover since it was only a bit more. The size is adorably portable and I love the sturdy and well made construction. I commute a lot by train and it’s nice to be able to stick a book in my bag without having to worry about it falling apart. Even the paper was nicer than what I’ve seen lately! At just 160 pages it was a fairly quick and easy read. What it…